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Moysian Fit meets Dummy Reversal

Hand of the Week

Dlr:
West
Vul:
E-W
North
♠ A 6 4
7 5 2
A Q 5 3
♣ A J 3
South
♠ Q J 10 3
K
K J 9 8 6
♣ 9 6 2
West North East South
1 Dbl 2 3♠
Pass 4♠ All Pass

The late Bridge World editor Sonny Moyse had a predilection for playing 4-3 trump fits, hence the name Moysian fit. Why play a 4-3 fit? To collect a game bonus, it is sometimes necessary to play 4 or 4♠ since the partnership lacks a stopper in another suit (making 3NT unplayable) but there are too many losers for 5♣ or 5.

A dummy reversal, by contrast, is a declarer technique by which ruffs are taken in the hand with longer trumps, while the enemy trumps are drawn with the master trumps in the short hand.

This deal from the 2001 European Championships features both strategems. Italy’s Giorgio Duboin and Norberto Bocchi opposed Poland’s Cezary Balicki and Adam Zmudzinski:

Duboin made the natural lead of the ♣K. At first glance, Zmudzinski could just drive out the trump king by playing the ♠A and another spade before running his diamonds and leading up to the ♣J. The problem with that plan is that the defenders will win the ♠K and start plugging away in hearts. Declarer will be tapped out of trumps before the ♣J can be established.

To avoid this fate, Zmudzinski led a low trump from dummy at trick two! East won the ♠K and switched to a heart, the ace winning, and another heart was played.

Zmudzinski ruffed and played a club toward the jack. Duboin took the queen and played another heart, but declarer was in control. He ruffed, cashed the ♠Q (his last trump), crossed to the A and drew the outstanding trumps with the ♠A. When the suit proved to be 3-3, he claimed.

The full deal:

Dlr:
Vul:
North
♠ A 6 4
7 5 2
A Q 5 3
♣ A J 3
West
♠ 9 8 2
A Q J 9 8
4
♣ K Q 10 4
East
♠ K 7 5
10 6 4 3
10 7 2
♣ 8 7 5
South
♠ Q J 10 3
K
K J 9 8 6
♣ 9 6 2