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Don’t Tell

Dlr:
South
Vul:
N-S
North
♠ K J 10 8 7 6
10 8 2
9
♣ A 8 5
South
♠ A
A Q 7 6 5 3
10 6 3 2
♣ K Q
West North East South
1
Pass 1♠ Pass 2
Pass 4 Pass Pass
Dbl All Pass

Every experienced player knows the danger of a penalty double with a trump stack. The double often guides declarer to the winning line of play – a line that probably would not be taken without the double.
This deal, from the U.S. Bridge Championship in Memphis last June, is a case in point. The opponents were two of the world’s top pairs – Jeff Meckstroth-Eric Rodwell versus Zia Mahmood-Michael Rosenberg.
It looks like three trumps tricks and a diamond for Rosenberg, but it didn’t work out that way.
Rosenberg started with theK, and Zia overtook to play the ♣J through the South hand. Rodwell won the club in his hand, cashed the ♠A and ruffed a diamond. A spade ruff was followed by the ♣Q. Rodwell then ruffed another diamond with the 8 and cashed the ♣A, discarding his last diamond.
At that point, Rodwell was down to five trumps. Rosenberg held four trumps and the Q. Rodwell played the ♠K from dummy and ruffed with the ♥7. Rosenberg could do no more than overruff with the 9 and play his last exit card – the Q.
Rodwell ruffed in dummy with the 10 and underruffed in his hand with the 5. It was easy from there. Rodwell ruffed a spade with the 6, and Rosenberg could overruff but was left on lead at trick 12 with the K 4 while Rodwell was sitting with the A Q.
At the other table, South also reached 4, but there was no double and declarer cashed the A early, giving him no chance for the contract.
The full deal:

Dlr:
Vul:
North
♠ K J 10 8 7 6
10 8 2
9
♣ A 8 5
West
♠ 9 5
K J 9 4
K Q 8 4
♣ 9 6 3
East
♠ Q 4 3 2
A J 7 5
♣ J 10 7 4 2
South
♠ A
A Q 7 6 5 3
10 6 3 2
♣ K Q